About ABCR

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The American Bashkir Curly Horse Registry (ABCR) was founded in 1971 and is the oldest Registry of Curly Horses. The goals of the ABCR are to preserve this rare horse breed, to promote the Curly Horse as much as possible in shows and in the media, provide education about the special features of the horses, and to protect the genetic pool of the small breed population worldwide.

Tuesday, December 30, 2014

YOU HAVE A WHAT? A STRAIGHT CURLY HORSE?

Did you know that there are also Straight Curly Horses? What sounds like an oxymoron is true for some of the Curly Horses. They are also called smooth Curlies, since their coat is extra soft compare...d to the coat of other horses especially in wintertime.
However, they also show the other characteristics of Curly Horses such as hard hooves, noticeably short, strong back, dense bones, even-tempered disposition and being hypoallergenic to many people suffering from allergies.
Overall, 86 % of all ABCR registered Curly Horses are curly, and 14 % are straight (smooth) coated.
 
 

JOIN OUR ANNUAL AWARDS!

2015 will be there tomorrow, this is your chance to participate in one of our ABCR Championchips! There is something for everyone: Youth rider, Performance Horse, Versatility Horse, Frequent Rider Program, Gymkhana/Speed Program and In Hand Program!
Rules can be found here: http://abcregistry.blogspot.de/p/abc-breed-promotion-annual-award.html
...
Applications can be found in our Forms section here: http://www.abcregistry.org/#/forms/4560672165

Questions? Contact Donna or Sue: secretary@abcregistry.org

 

ABCR FOUNDATION HORSES

On this picture, you can see ABCR 276 COLONEL'S BAY BOY, sired by ABCR 148 COLONEL AUSTIN out of ABCR 63 COPPER QUEEN. He sired 8 ABCR registered foals, most of them Al-Marah horses. Enjoy!

QUESTION: HOW DO I AVOID COMMON MISTAKES WHEN I BUY A (CURLY) HORSE?

We found this Top Ten Mistakes that even experienced horse buyers make for your consideration.
http://www.equinelegalsolutions.com/toptenhorsebuyingmistakes.html


Sunday, December 28, 2014

DID YOU KNOW?

ABCR checks the average COI (Coeffiecient of Inbreeding) in the Closed Books (Full and Blood Percentage). We used the reduced formular of Wright for it, based on 5 generations.

We encourage all of our breeders to check the C...OI before breeding (we offer that as a FREE SERVICE to our members, non-members can buy that service, too), because a COI of below 1 % is recommended to avoid inbreeding depression within especially a small population (DGfZ (1992)).

Please contact us regarding any questions you might have with your Curly Horses.

You can find more Information on this topic here: http://www.abcregistry.org/#/research/4582203889
 
 

Friday, December 26, 2014

Monday, December 22, 2014

REGISTER YOUR CURLY HORSE WITH US TODAY!

Registering your Curly Horse at ABCR includes the following advantages:

- Identification of your Curly Horse by DNA and description/pictures documented in the ABCR database and in the pedigree cer...tificate you receive

- Recording of your Curly Horse’s bloodlines, approved by DNA in the Full and Blood Percentage Book which is important for breeder’s programs

- By making the data of your horse available to the large database driven collection of registered Curly Horses (containing more than 5,600 entries of Curly Horses worldwide) you support further research on the unique traits of the Curly Horse.

Learn more about the Registration Process here: http://abcregistry.blogspot.de/p/how-do-i.html
 
 

ABOUT CURLY HORSES

Curly Horses are a rare and beautiful breed, coming in different conformation types, but generally with a wonderful disposition that usually makes them great beginner horses. They are not just Curly Horses, but the curly coat seems to be also hypoallergenic. People who suffer from horse allergies often react very little, if at all, to the Curly Horse.

The American Bashkir Curly Horse Registry (ABCR) was founded in 1971 and is the oldest Registry of Curly Horses. The goals of... the ABCR are to preserve this rare breed, to promote the Curly Horse as much as possible in shows and in the media, provide education about the special features of the horses, and to protect the genetic pool of the small breed population worldwide.The ABCR has registred over 4,100 Full, 750 Straight and 750 Part Bred Curly Horses since 1971 and is the largest Registry for American Bashkir Curly Horses worldwide.





 

ABCR HORSE AND RIDER

Do you recognize Horse and Rider? Enjoy!

Sunday, December 21, 2014

QUESTION: HOW CAN I TELL THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A CURLY HORSE AND A HORSE WITH THE CUSHING SYNDROM?

Cushing’s Disease in horses typically develops as the horse enters its senior years. Equine Cushing’s disease is a result of a number of h...ormone related problems that derive from changes in the brain.

Unlike the Curly Horse, Horses with Cushing Syndrom have a hard time shedding their coats in spring. Excessive thirst and urination, increased appetite with no weight gain, loss of muscle over the top line as well as chronic laminitis are symptoms for Cushings, too.

Another difference is that the 'curls' of a horse with the Cushing Syndrom are seen only in body hair, it's ear hairs, fetlocks, mane, and tail are straight.

The curly coat of a Curly Horse is NO SIGN for a disease at all, but a wanted characteristic of the Curly Horse breed! On the pictures here, we are definitely looking at Curly Horses. Their curls in ears, mane, fetlocks and tail do not shed in spring, but are also visible in summertime!


DID YOU KNOW?

 
Owner or lessee of the dam at the time of foaling is the legal owner of the foal and therefore is RESPONSIBLE FOR REGISTERING THE FOAL. A copy of the lease agreement must be sent to the ABC Registry, in order for the foal to be eligible for registration. In addition, if an individual is leasing a stallion, a copy of the lease agreement must be sent to the ABC Registry in order for the foal to be eligible for registration.



CURLY HORSES IN MOTION

Want to see Curly Horses in motion? Have a look here:

http://abcregistry.blogspot.de/p/curly-horses-on-tvvideo.html

CURLY HORSES INTERVIEW

For everyhone that was missing Marion's interview yesterday, you can hear it online here: http://www.horsesinthemorning.com/hitm-for-12-12-2014-by-kentucky-performance-products-toddlers-horses-american-bakshir-curly-free-goats/

Thanks Marion!

THANK YOU!

ABCR would like to say a big THANK YOU to all members, friends and supporters! 2014 has been a good year for the organization. Despite the decreasing economy, the number of ABCR registered horses has been constant with over 75 new registrat...ions this year up to now. In 2014, we were able to offer new services for our members such as an ABCR pedigree database online, DNA genetic disease bundles or calculations on the coifficient of inbreeding (COI). Without your continuing support, that would not have been possible! So again, THANK YOU, have a Merry Christmas and a happy and healthy new year 2015!
 
 

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

CURLY HORSE FAQ

Not sure about the Curly Horse? Check out our ABCR Curly Horse FAQ or ask if you are missing your question!

https://www.facebook.com/notes/american-bashkir-curly-registry/abcr-curly-horse-faq/314662122024302


STATISTICS

About 50 % of all ABCR registered Curly Horses are DNAed. This means more than 2,700 DNAed ABCR Curly Horses.





+ + + FEATURED ABCR BREEDERS + + +

If you are interested in Curly Horses and pass the southeast of Tennessee, visit Carrie Wakefield and her SILVER STORM FARM! Stallion Silver Twisted Saint ABCR 4068. Find Details here: http://www.silverstormfarm.com/

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

HORSE HEALTH

Learn what to consider during the winter months here: http://www.thehorse.com/articles/35032/horse-welfare-keeping-horses-healthy-through-the-winter

HELP US SOVLING THE RIDDLE!

We found this beautiful painting of a Curly Horse on the Internet ... but no hint where it comes from or who painted it ... do YOU know? Then let us know!

+ NEWS FROM OUR BLOOD PERCENTAGE REGISTRY +

Welcome together with us our latest Blood Percentage Curly Horse

PB776-S MY EZ SABER!

Congratulations to Washington!


Monday, December 15, 2014

CURLY HORSE HAIR

Thanks for reminding us on the coat qualities of our Curly Horses, Shawn! Curious what can be done with horse hair? Have a look here: http://horseandman.com/handy-tips/the-many-uses-for-horsehair-who-knew/12/12/2013/

JOIN US AND SEE WHAT IS FREE!

Learn more about the services that are free for ABCR members which are among others:

- PREFERRED MEMBER RATES: Benefit from discounts on ABCR services for members that can quickly return the cost of a member...ship. Find details about our services and related fees here: http://www.abcregistry.org/#/fees/4582021615

- FREE ONLINE RESOURCES: Have access to a Member Area online with great resources like historical and full searchable studbooks, latest research results and many more.

- FREE SEARCHABLE ONLINE STUDBOOK: ABCR provides a fully linked ABCR Curly Horse Studbook ONLINE with more than 7,100 entries and currently 2,100 pictures including all ABCR horses. You can surf the fully linked pedigrees with pictures, explore full and half siblings, see the offspring and have a look at reverse and vertical pedigrees. You can also do trial matings and use the ABCR name generator.

- ONLINE ACCESS TO HORSE FILES: Members have free read-access to the files of their ABCR horses in the ABCR cloud. ll you need is a Google eMail account and a proof of ownership. Send your request or questions to fileaccess@abcregistry.org.

- BREEDER SERVICES: As a breeder, you are listed on the ABCR Webpage and promoted on Facebook. With nearly 250.000 visitors our webpage is a great marketing platform worldwide! Get also FREE SUPPORT calculating the Coefficient of Inbreeding (COI) and Pedigree Quality of their existing ABCR horses or planned offspring. If required, ABCR supports breeders also FOR FREE with DNA comparisons against all registered ABCR horses.
 
 

QUESTION: I DO UNDERSTAND THAT ABCR HAS AN OPEN OUTCROSS BOOK AND A MUSTANG BOOK. BUT WHY HAS ABCR A CLOSED BOOK FOR CURLY HORSES?


Before a closed book was implemented at ABCR, every horse with a curly coat and known or unknown parentage could be registered. Then, in the 1990s, the CS Fund, a grant-making, California-based foundation, gave some scientifical advice to close the books. The following... excerpt explains about the reasons for this and is taken from Equus, March 1990:

"... In an effort to prevent the loss of these minor breeds' gene pools, the CS Fund commissioned a pilot study of the American Curly Horse, a breed numbering fewer than 1,000, whose signature kinky coat and obscure origins set it apart from the mainstream of modern horsedom. What the study found may help save the Curly Horse as well as provide the means through which other threatened domestic equine breeds, including the Shire, Cleveland Bay, Hackney, and Lipizan, may survive.

The CS Fund's study combined three approaches
- laboratory analyses, pedigree searches, and painstaking
- examination of written and oral historical records
- to define the Curly breed.
A research study performed in 1975 by Keith Farrell, PhD, of Washington State University, had already disclosed that the only significant difference between curly horse hair and straight horsehair is in the shape of the shaft. As with human hair, curly horsehair is oval in shape while straight hair is round.

When D. Phillip Sponenberg, DVM, PhD, of the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine in Blacksburg, Virginia, examined the first two stud books of the American Bashkir Curly Registry, he discovered that two mechanisms appear to govern the appearance of curly coats in offspring. Some registered Curly Horses had been produced by two straight-haired parents, and, therefore, the characteristic had resulted from a recessive gene. This genetic "hiccup," if you will, can pop up in nearly any breed of horse, but it probably occurs most often in Percherons. The majority of the registered Curly Horses, however, were products of matings in which at least one of the parents was also curly coated, suggesting the existence of a dominant gene. In other words, the coat characteristic must be visible in the parents to appear in their offspring.

An important genetic distinction exists between the two varieties. "The recessive type," says Shan Thomas, administrative director of the CS Fund, "is first and foremost a member of his parent's breed. He is a Missouri Fox Trotter or Quarter Horse upon whom nature bestowed a curly coat. The second, dominant type might be a breed." Currently, the American Bashkir Registry does not distinguish between the two types.

Blood-typing of 200 curly-coated horses as well as 12 straight-haired horses of Curly Horse pedigree were then performed by An Bowling, PhD, of the serology laboratory at the University of California-Davis. The intent was not to verify parentage, as is usually the purpose of the procedure, which identifies and compares blood components. Instead, the CS Fund was hoping the blood would provide some clues as to how a horse becomes curly coated, whether the Curly Horse is distinct genetically from other breeds of horses, and whether there is any difference between the recessive and dominant types.

Although the blood-typing results verified the findings of the other areas of research, they did not identify characteristics unique to the Curly Horse. "There was no single marker common to all horses with curly coats," says Thomas. "If one had been found, this would have led to further study to see if such a marker were directly related to the gene for curly hair."

Genetic diversity was the primary finding of Bowling's work. Within the group of sampled horses, 110 of a possible 135 equine variants were present. This high number is not surprising, says Bowling, in a registry with an open studbook and active crossbreeding program. About half of the markers identified were "rare and unusual," a rate consistent with other breeds, but they were present in only four percent of the tested population. Blood-typing of one Curly disclosed a variant that had not been identified in any North American horse tested but only among South American horses of Spanish ancestry.

Bowling found that the blood components of the 212 tested horses most closely resembled those of the Quarter Horse and Morgan, breeds commonly used for crossbreeding. But a few of the horses also had some variants not usually found in modern North American breeds.

Interestingly, these components are present in the blood of the straight-haired feral horses of Nevada's Great Basin region. Three separate groups of Curlies from Nevada, Canada, and the Dakotas retain the most remnants of the original genetic pool, indicating that these horses are likely descendants of feral stock. The result, says Bowling, is that the horses are a "source of some unusual genetic material that can't be found elsewhere." At the same time, Curlies carry a heavy mix of characteristics common to other domestic breeds.

In the historical section of the study, four theories of the breed's origin were scrutinized. The unusual coat has variously been ascribed to the introduction of horses from Russia or from South America, mutations in native-born stock, and the remnants of pre-Spanish horses that unaccountably escaped extinction when all other equidae on the continent were wiped out eons before. Though the study did confirm the presence of curly-coated horses in both Russia and South America, it was "unable to prove that a dominant curly-coated horse breed was introduced or imported to North America," says Thomas. It also confirmed that the Curly Horse did not obtain its unique coat from the Russian Bashkir breed, which, in fact, is a straight-haired horse. Instead, evidence appears to point to a "spontaneous mutation" or adaptation of feral horses and that this adaptation can be the result of either a dominant or recessive gene.

"From both the empirical evidence and the blood work," says Thomas, "there is justification for two and possibly three coincidental mutations that resulted in curly horse breeds in Russia, North America, and South America. These three breeds have common ancestors. You don't see these mutations among horses with pony ancestors, for example. Isolated mutations are not uncommon in nature. We suspect that in these three separate groups of horses, the mutation was instigated or supported by severe environmental conditions. There is good anecdotal evidence that curly-coated horses can survive cold better than those with straight hair. And interestingly, the regions where these three curly-haired groups developed are all similar in environment, being high-altitude plains."

The fact that a curly coat remains in these horses, continues Thomas, "is only one sign of a breed that once existed and has now been nearly crossbred out of existence. The Curly Horse breed is now three distinct types: the stock-horse type from crosses with Quarter Horses, Appaloosas, and Paints; the Fox Trotter type; and a more-refined type from crosses with Arabians, Morgans, and Saddlebreds." Although the curly coat remains in some of these crosses, the horse is genetically more Quarter Horse or Morgan or Fox Trotter than pure Curly.

Owners and breeders of curly-coated horses can go in several directions now that breed genetics are better understood, says Thomas. "If interested, they could attempt a regeneration program. With attention to genetics and by tapping the three pockets of original gene pool left, they might be able to use linebreeding to recreate what once was. DNA research, though expensive, would help this project significantly by giving very specific information about group membership. Unless this happens, the original Curly Horse breed can be considered extinct.

"If breeders choose, alternately, to move forward from here," she continues, "it would be necessary to acknowledge in the registry the existence of the three subsections of the breed, standardize within these types, stop crossing between the types, and close the stud books."

#ABCRHistory #ABCRResearch

+ NEWS FROM OUR FULL CURLY REGISTRY +

Welcome together with us our latest Full Curly Horse

4114 KARMA'S DELIGHT!

Congratulations to Idaho!


Sunday, December 14, 2014

+ NEWS FROM OUR OUTCROSS REGISTRY +

Welcome together with us our latest Outcross Curly Horse

O10 RALI'S TUPELO HONEY!

Congratulations to Ohio!


JOIN US NOW!

Learn more about the benefits joining us here:

http://abcregistry.blogspot.de/p/sign-up-now-and-profit-by-services-and.html



+ + + FEATURED ABCR BREEDERS + + +

Living in Switzerland, and looking for a Curly Horse? Contact Veronika Schmid in Uettligen! Stallion at stud is STAG CREEK MECATE ABCR 3931. Find more details here: http://www.special-color.ch/hengstCStagCreekMecateNEU.htm

CURLY HORSES AND KIDS

... a perfect match! Thanks HorseBuds Therapeutic Riding Center for sharing!

Saturday, December 13, 2014

HORSE HEALTH

Is it cold now at your neck of the woods? We found great cold weather tips for horse owners! http://www.thehorse.com/articles/35015/cold-weather-tips-for-horse-owners

FOUNDATION CURLY HORSES

Do you love historical Curly Horse pictures as much as we do? Here we go! On this picture, you see ABCR 75 KUBLA KHAN, a chestnut appaloosa, foaled 1971 and owned by Glen Kugler.

QUESTION: I AM A BEGINNER WITH HORSES, AND I HAVE HEARD THAT CURLY HORSES ARE A GOOD CHOICE FOR ME. IS THIS TRUE?

First of all, Curly Horses are horses and act like other horses do. So if you are not very familiar with horses, it is a goo...d idea to have a skilled friend or trainer around to help you. As a beginner, you might want to look for an older, experienced and trained Curly Companion instead of a foal or youngster.

However, it is true that Curlies often have a calm temperament and a gentle disposition. Usually they are very curious, people-oriented and often comparably easy to handle, which can make them a real good choice for beginners for sure!
 
 

DID YOU KNOW?

You can buy all of our Services like Membership, Registration, T-Shirts and many more ONLINE in our shop! You can pay with PayPal, Credit Card or Direct Debit. Check it out!

https://www.facebook.com/notes/american-bashkir-curly-registry/how-do-i-shop-at-abcr/299319706891877



Friday, December 12, 2014

NEW SERVICES

ABCR now offers DNA testing for genetic diseases at special rates. This includes the following test that CAN BE TAKEN FROM ALREADY EXISITING DNA SAMPLES provided for parentage verification:

- Equine Disease Panel (GBED, HERD...A, HYPP, MH, LWO)
- CA/LFS panel
- HERDA
- GBED
- CA
- LFS
- HYPP

You can buy the tests here: http://www.abcregistry.org/#/shop/4556739652/genetic-disease-dna-testing/8925385.

Unfortunately, UCD does not offer the PSSM1 test due to license reasons. Please use other labs for this test, e.g. http://www.animalgenetics.us/Equine/Equine_Test_Now.asp.


HAPPY SATURDAY

... with your Curly Horse!

LOOK HIM IN THE EARS!

Curly Horses show they curls in their ears all year long!







+ + + FEATURED ABCR BREEDERS + + +

Visit WOODKE’S WALNUT WOODS managed by Marvin Woodke when you are in North Central Indiana. Stallions are DCC DRIFTER ABC 2287, SLL SOR PATRICK'S LIL CHIP ABC 3366 and MVR ECLIPSE ABC 3358. Contact Marvin by eMail marvwoodke@gmail.com or phone 574-542-2457. Some videos of his horses can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA93A873179DE6927, too.

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

ABCR FOUNDATION HORSES

Straight Curly Horse Lovers, here it is: ABCR S-1 STRIKE, out of RED HUSSY MQHA 8060-P, sired by CURLY Q, ridden by Deborah Mitchell. Enjoy!

EVER WONDERED HOW THE FREMONT WOOLLY HORSE LOOKED LIKE?

EVER WONDERED HOW THE FREMONT WOOLLY HORSE LOOKED LIKE?

You find a detailed description from 1882 here, enjoy!

+ NEWS FROM OUR FULL CURLY REGISTRY +

Welcome together with us our latest Full Curly Horse

4115 HCC NEKOTA!

Congratulations to South Dakota!


Tuesday, December 9, 2014